How Adopting a Cat Kid Can Boost Your Health

Eating fruits and veggies. Getting regular exercise. Parenting a cat. Though that last one may not seem like the others, having a cat kid can be beneficial to your physical and mental health, just like eating well and staying active. Read on for some fun facts on how bringing a cat kid home can be good for you — and how you can return the favor (including by using the best natural cat litter out there).

Say yes to less stress

Even when they’re inexplicably leaping in the air or sprinting across the living room after dozing peacefully in a patch of sunshine, cat kids can have a calming effect on their human family members. According to HelpGuide, petting your cat kid can provide sensory stress relief — particularly if they start purring. It turns out their purrs aren’t just good for their own health — they’re also good for yours. A cat’s purr can calm your nervous system, which helps reduce stress and anxiety. Playing with them can increase your levels of serotonin and dopamine, which helps you relax and feel good. Plus, their companionship can lessen feelings of loneliness, whether they’re snuggling on your lap or slow blinking at you from the other side of the couch.

Hello, cat kid. Goodbye, high blood pressure.

Those mental health benefits of having a cat kid can boost your physical health as well. Less stress and anxiety can lead to lower blood pressure as well as a decreased risk of heart disease and stroke. Catonsville Cat Clinic highlights a study showing that “people who owned cats were less likely to die from a heart attack than those without one.” They also point out that your cat kid can improve your sleep thanks to the comfort they provide while snoozing near you on the bed (though that might not hold true if they curl up on your head at 4 o’clock in the morning).

Bonus benefit for those with young children: The cat clinic shares that having a cat can help children, particularly those under a year old, develop a stronger immune system, which can help fight off a variety of allergies.

Staying healthy together

If you’re looking forward to the health benefits of pet parenthood, you can return the favor by keeping your new cat kid as healthy as possible. Make sure to set aside play time, schedule regular vet visits, feed them fresh and natural foods, and study up on cat care tips for healthy nails, skin, and hair. When it comes to cat litter, consider choosing an environmentally friendly cat litter that’s good for you, your cat kid, and the planet. Naturally Fresh is a non-toxic cat litter that’s free of harmful silica dust, which helps you both breathe easy. Not only is it biodegradable, compostable, and sustainable, it’s a walnut shell litter that organically neutralizes odors, making it the best cat litter for odor control. Plus, it’s a low-tracking cat litter that doesn’t stick to paws, which will reduce stress all around.


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